Legal Internship Programme

Intern positions are available for undergraduate law students, postgraduate law students, and newly qualified lawyers at the International Bar Association's offices in London, The Hague, and Washington DC.

More information can be found in the drop down boxes below. Click on the '+' to expand the box. If you have any further queries, contact us.

Intern positions are available for undergraduate law students, postgraduate law students, and newly qualified lawyers at the International Bar Association's offices in London, The Hague, and Washington DC.

Founded in 1947, the International Bar Association (IBA) is the world's largest organisation of law societies, bar associations, law firms and individual lawyers. The IBA is involved with cutting edge issues affecting the international legal community and as an intern you can become involved in the work of the Association.

The IBA plays an active role in:

  • promoting the status and independence of the profession
  • bringing lawyers together to exchange information and to discuss matters of mutual concern
  • promoting the administration of justice under the rule of law
  • promoting human rights
  • promoting commercial and economic law reform

Intern role:

Selected interns will assist the IBA in developing academic papers and research on key legal topics of both local and international relevance. Interns will have an opportunity to become involved in the work of the following aspects of the Association:

  • supporting the IBA's Human Rights Institute
  • supporting the IBA's Legal Projects Team (commercial and business law)
  • supporting the IBA's International Criminal Court (ICC) Programme
  • supporting the IBA’s Washington DC Office.

Interns will be able to draft policy papers on substantive legal issues as well as assisting in preparing background research for grant proposals. Interns will also be able to assist in implementing technical assistance programmes in developing countries.

The IBA and interns' work:

In 1995, the IBA established its Human Rights Institute (IBAHRI) under the Honorary Presidency of Nelson Mandela, to fulfil its objectives to promote and protect human rights and the independence of the legal profession under a just rule of law.

In order to advance our objectives, the IBAHRI undertakes a variety of projects to build capacity, lobby for change and highlight issues of international concern to the public, the media and the legal community. Our core activities include training for lawyers and judges; capacity building with bar associations and law societies; undertaking high-level fact-finding missions; and conducting trial observations. The IBAHRI also works on a number of thematic programmes.

IBAHRI interns are invaluable to the work of the Institute. Typical tasks undertaken by interns include:

  • researching and drafting country background reports for IBAHRI missions;
  • conducting legal research in thematic areas;
  • drafting intervention letters;
  • researching and drafting project briefing notes;
  • trial monitoring;
  • media monitoring and press summaries;
  • researching the independence of the judiciary and the legal profession; and
  • supporting IBAHRI events.

Skills and experience required:

  • advanced studies in international human rights and/or humanitarian law;
  • excellent legal research and analysis skills;
  • experience of legal writing and drafting;
  • strong interpersonal oral and written skills;
  • familiarity with internet- based research; and
  • fluency in Spanish, French or Arabic an asset.

Location and contact

Please read 'Applying for internships - procedure' below before applying. 

Ms Helen Ugwu
Intern Programme Manager
International Bar Association
4th Floor, 10 St Bride Street
London, EC4A 4AD
United Kingdom

Phone: +44 (0)20 7842 0090
internprogramme@int-bar.org

More information on the IBAHRI

The IBA’s International Criminal Court (ICC) Programme commenced in 2005, monitoring fair trial issues at the ICC and encouraging the legal community to engage with the work of the Court.  The Programme conducts thematic legal analysis of the ICC’s pre-trial and trial proceedings, and ad hoc evaluations of legal, administrative and institutional issues which could potentially affect the rights of defendants, the impartiality of proceedings and the development of international justice. The Programme also acts as the interface between the Court and the global legal community.

Based at the Peace Palace in The Hague, the IBA’s ICC Programme consults and interacts with Court officials, civil society organisations, academics and international lawyers.

Typical projects undertaken by interns include:

  • Extensive research and writing
  • collection of material for IBA reports
  • analysis of evolving ICC jurisprudence and policy developments
  • preparation of briefing notes for meetings, presentations and events
  • assisting with organising internal database of research material
  • assisting with routine office administration as required.

Skills and experience required:

  • Advanced studies in international criminal, humanitarian and/or human rights law (Masters / PhD level preferred);
  • excellent research, writing and analysis skills;
  • strong interpersonal oral and written skills;
  • familiarity with computer based research;
  • fluency in French an asset;
  • experience organising workshops and or seminars, an advantage;
  • prior working experience in a court (ICC, ICTY, etc.), NGO or other national or international organisation, an advantage

Location and contact

Please read 'Applying for internships - procedure' below before applying

IBA Programme Manager (ICC)
International Bar Association
Peace Palace, Carnegieplein 2
2517 KJ
The Hague, The Netherlands

Phone The Hague office: +31 (0) 70 302 2859 or
in London, Ms Anna-Maria Balntas at: +44 (0)20 7842 0090
Hague.internprogramme@int-bar.org
 

More information on the IBA's ICC Programme

The IBA Legal Projects Team (LPT) supports different IBA initiatives in commercial and business law as well as in issues affecting the legal profession. For more information about the work and current LPT projects click here

LPT interns are supervised by staff lawyers with international experience in a range of commercial areas and with a strong interest in issues affecting the legal profession.

Typical projects undertaken by interns include:

  • Conducting legal research, drafting reports and working papers in variety of commercial topics including anti-corruption, multi-jurisdictional practice, corporate governance, anti-money laundering, merger control, competition law and policy, and international trade;
  • Assisting in conducting legal surveys and analysing survey results;
  • Updating information for websites such as the Anti-Money Laundering Forum;
  • Contributing to IBA and external publications;
  • Planning and developing new international legal projects;
  • Supporting the expansion of strategic global initiatives such as the IBA OECD UNODC Anti-Corruption Strategy for the Legal Profession.

Skills and experience required:

  • Advanced studies in business and economic law (Masters / PhD level preferred);
  • excellent research, writing and analysis skills;
  • strong interpersonal oral and written skills;
  • familiarity with computer based legal research;
  • fluency in Spanish, French or Arabic an asset.

Location and contact

Please read 'Applying for internships - procedure' below before applying

Ms Helen Ugwu
Intern Programme Manager
International Bar Association
4th Floor, 10 St Bride Street
London, EC4A 4AD
United Kingdom

Phone: +44 (0)20 7842 0090
internprogramme@int-bar.org

More information on the LPT

The IBA opened its North American office in Washington DC in August 2013. The mission of this office is threefold:

  1. Serve and expand its membership in North America, namely international lawyers, but also law schools and law students. 
  2. Engage in public service, including the implementation of programmes that promote the rule of law and human rights in the developing world and North America. 
  3. Provide thought leadership on issues critical to the legal profession, the rule of law and human rights throughout the world.   

Typical projects undertaken by interns include:

  • Developing concept papers and grant proposals in the field of international development;
  • researching & writing remarks for conferences, some of which may be converted into academic papers for publication;
  • assisting with logistics, media solicitations, panellist selection and support for conferences and round tables;
  • organising and contributing to IBA reports & internal research database and analysing evolving trends in legal profession or international development;
  • assisting with expense logging and financial tracking, document creation, meeting preparation, recording of minutes, and outreach.

Skills and experience required:

  • Excellent research, writing and analysis skills;
  • strong interpersonal oral and written skills;
  • self-motivation and emotional intelligence;
  • mastery of computer/internet-based research;
  • experience organising or contributing to workshops and/or seminars;
  • experience abroad is an advantage;
  • fluency in a foreign language is a plus.

Location and contact

Please read 'Applying for internships - procedure' below before applying

Mr Jason Davis
Program Associate
International Bar Association, North America Office
1667 K Street NW, Suite 1230
Washington, DC 20006

Phone: +1 202 827 3274
jason.davis@int-bar.org

 

Internships are for a minimum of 12 weeks and a maximum of six months. Internships are full-time, Monday to Friday, up to 40 hours per week. Hours of work are usually 9.30am to 5.30pm with one hour for lunch.

Interns are given two days' holiday per calendar month working with the IBA.

How many other interns will be working at the IBA?

In London, there is space for ten interns per three month intake and we always aim to fill all places. However, at the start and end of internship periods, there may be times when there are fewer interns in the office. In The Hague, there are generally 2-3 interns at one time and in Washington DC, 1-2 interns.

Where do interns come from?

We have interns join us from around the world. 

What is the dress code for interns?

Smart clothes, such as trousers, blouses, shirts and skirts are fine. Men must be smart but suits are not necessary. No jeans or trainers unless there is an official 'dress down Friday'.

What is the minimum level of education required in order to undertake an IBA internship?

We ideally hope to receive applications from postgraduate law students; however, the nature and scope of the work involved means that to be eligible, you must have completed at minimum one year of an undergraduate law degree.

What is the average age of interns?

Interns generally range from 20 to 35 years of age, but interns of any age are welcome.

Can I have a paid job whilst working as an intern at the IBA?

We understand that you may need to work part time in order to support yourself financially. However, we will expect you to continue to work full time at the IBA.

Who will I be working with?

Depending on the project you are working on, you will either report to members of staff in the IBA office or deal via e-mail and phone with other prominent international lawyers.

How will I be treated?

As an intern, you will be treated as an IBA member of staff and will get invited to office parties, celebrations and staff lunches.

What is a typical day like whilst I am an intern?

It is difficult to summarise what a typical day is like being an intern, as it is dependent on the type of projects you are working on. The work you do is not simply like writing an essay, which does not get used when you leave. You will be contributing to research that could ultimately secure funding for a project, assist local bars with undertaking their own training and capacity building, as well as writing speeches and academic papers that form the basis of the work of the IBA.

For typical projects, see the IBA and interns' work boxes above.

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Applying for internships - procedure:

We try to keep interns in blocks of three months because of office space considerations, so ask that you suggest dates within these blocks of dates when applying. We may be flexible on start dates if these do not correspond to your semester.

Intake for internships in London Closing date for applications
30 June to 26 September 2014 28 February 2014
29 Sept to 26 December 2014 30 May 2014
5 January to 2 April 2015 29 August 2014
7 April to 3 July 2015 28 November 2014

Intake for internships in The Hague Closing date for applications
1 Jan to 30 April (or up to June) 15 November
1 June to 30 Sept (or up to Nov) 30 March
1 Sept to 31 Dec (or up to Feb) 15 July

Positions in The Hague are available throughout the year but usually run in four month blocks, and may be extended up to six months.

Intake for internships in Washington DC Closing date for applications
20 Jan to 9 May 2014 6 December 2013
12 May to 1 Aug 2014 14 March 2014
4 Aug to 5 December 2014 1 June 2014

Applications for each intake period are not reviewed until after the relevant closing date. It is best to submit your application not more than 1-2 months in advance of the closing date so that the information provided is up to date.

 Send the following explaining your interest in the IBA Internship Programme (addresses below):

  1. Covering letter - this should set out the following:
      - Why you wish to be considered for an intern position
      - The dates you would be able to take up your position
      - Specific research experience and areas of law that you are interested in
     
  2. Full Curriculum Vitae (CV / resume)
     
  3. Application form (you must save this form to your computer before filling it in):
  4. Writing sample* - The writing sample could be a legal essay that you have written for your college degree programme or a report that you have written on a legal topic of interest. Sample must be in English only and not more than 4-5 pages in length. (*Writing sample not required for applications to the Washington DC office.) Because of the nature of the internship placements, much of the work will involve writing reports, letters, or assisting in the preparation of academic articles. The writing sample is useful for us to see how you structure a piece of written work and how you form and support an argument.
     
  5. Letter of reference - a letter from an academic tutor or employer mentioning your academic background, personality and suitability for the internship programme. This should be sent directly by your referee. If you are applying for funding, your academic referee should state their opinion on your eligibility to receive a grant as part of their overall reference.

Applications, reference letters and questions regarding London internships should be sent via e-mail to internprogramme@int-bar.org or by post to:

Ms Helen Ugwu
Intern Programme Manager
International Bar Association
4th Floor, 10 St Bride Street
London, EC4A 4AD
United Kingdom

Phone: +44 (0)20 7842 0090


Applications, reference letters and questions regarding The Hague internships should be sent via e-mail to Hague.internprogramme@int-bar.org or by post to:

IBA Programme Manager (ICC)
International Bar Association
Peace Palace, Carnegieplein 2
2517 KJ
The Hague, The Netherlands

Phone The Hague office: +31 (0) 70 302 2859 or
in London, Ms Anna-Maria Balntas at: +44 (0)20 7842 0090


Applications, reference letters and questions regarding  Washington DC internships should be sent via e-mail to jason.davis@int-bar.org or by post to:

Mr Jason Davis, Program Associate
International Bar Association, North America Office
1667 K Street NW, Suite 1230
Washington, DC 20006

Phone: +1 202 827 3274

Once the IBA is in receipt of ALL the information required, it will take a minimum of four weeks after the closing date to hear whether you have been selected.

The offer of any internship is conditional upon you being able to satisfy eligibility criteria to work in the relevant country in accordance with applicable immigration rules. Due to the high volume of applications that the IBA receives, offers will remain open for acceptance for 10 working days from the date of the offer. If we do not hear from you within that period we will assume that the offer is rejected and it will be withdrawn and offered to the next successful applicant.

You will need to confirm your acceptance of the internship place within ten days of receiving the offer. We will then send you an Offer Letter and detailed information about the programme.

Once an internship place has been offered by the IBA, interns must consult their nearest British, Dutch or US mission for details on visa requirements. The offer of any internship is conditional upon you being able to satisfy eligibility criteria to work in the relevant country, in accordance with applicable immigration rules. You are strongly advised to establish your immigration status as soon as possible.

All offers are conditional upon ability to satisfy immigration requirements.  If your visa application is declined, there is little that the IBA can do to help and you would be unable to take up your position.

Visa for the UK

The IBA strongly advises all interns contact their British mission overseas to get the latest updated information on what they require to enter the United Kingdom.

BUNAC

The IBA is not able to sponsor visas and advises contacting BUNAC, who are authorised by the UK Border Agency to issue a Certificate of Sponsorship to successful applicants who can then apply for a visa before entering Britain. BUNAC accepts applications all year round from students or recent graduates of any nationality in need of sponsorship.

For further information, visit the BUNAC website. All interns are responsible for paying BUNAC for their service.

Work permit/visa for the Netherlands

If you are not a European citizen, you may require a work permit or visa in order to undertake an internship in the Netherlands. The IBA advises contacting the Dutch mission in your home country for the latest information on what they require to enter the Netherlands.

The Study in Holland website also has helpful guidance on requirements for internships in the Netherlands.

Visa for the USA

All applicants must ensure that they are legally permitted to work in the United States. Applicants from outside the U.S. must be able to comply with and obtain their own J-1 visas. Please consult the J-1 Visa Exchange Visitor website for a list of Designated Sponsor Organisations.

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Assistance for interns

You will need to be able to support yourself whilst interning with the IBA. The IBA will pay research expenses such as trips to libraries, etc. Please bear in mind that accommodation and travel are expensive in London. Accommodation is also relatively expensive in The Hague and Washington DC. Public transit tends to be costly in DC but is quite reasonable in The Hague.

London

The IBA Educational Trust is granting funding (to a maximum of £1500 each) in the London office to students who would not otherwise be able to take up the position due to financial constraints. Priority is given to applicants from developing countries, but other applicants will be considered. Please note that only applicants for internships in London are eligible to apply for this funding.

The Hague

For internships in the Hague office, the IBA Human Rights Institute Trust is granting funding (to a maximum of €2000 each) to students who would not otherwise be able to take up the position due to financial constraints. If you wish to be considered for this funding, please complete the IBA Human Rights Institute Trust funding application form and submit it with your complete ICC Programme Internship application. Please note that only applicants for internships in The Hague will be considered, and funding is not guaranteed upon receipt of application.

Washington DC

There is no funding available for internships in Washington DC at this time.

Interns are responsible for finding their own accommodation. In London, you may want to search flat share websites such as www.spareroom.co.uk or try the Youth Hostel Association or Halls of Residence in local universities to see if they have any space. In The Hague, it is best to get in touch with other interns from the international organisations and tribunals. You may also use local rental agencies, but the fees they charge are quite high. In Washington DC, you may want to search for short-term lease options using online tools like www.apartmentfinder.com.

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Contact

General enquiries: internprogramme@int-bar.org
London office: Ms Helen Ugwu
 

Intern Programme Manager
International Bar Association
4th Floor, 10 St Bride Street
London, EC4A 4AD
United Kingdom

Phone: +44 (0)20 7842 0090

internprogramme@int-bar.org

Hague office: IBA Programme Manager (ICC)
 

International Bar Association
Peace Palace, Carnegieplein 2
2517 KJ
The Hague, The Netherlands

Phone: +31 (0) 70 302 2859 or
in London, Ms Anna-Maria Balntas at: +44 (0)20 7842 0090

Hague.internprogramme@int-bar.org

Washington DC office: Mr Jason Davis
  Program Associate
International Bar Association, North America Office
1667 K Street NW, Suite 1230
Washington, DC 20006

Phone: +1 202 827 3274

jason.davis@int-bar.org

 

 

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