ICC Moot Court Competition

ICC Moot Court Competition

The Hague, the Netherlands

#ICCMCC

The International Criminal Court (ICC) Moot Court Competition, hosted by The Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies at Leiden University, in partnership with the IBA, attracts top students in international law from 70 universities in 50 countries across six continents.

It is one of the most prestigious international moot court competitions and aims to improve participants’ knowledge of the ICC, the Rome Statute and international criminal law in general. The competition offers a great opportunity for participants to gain first-hand experience in articulating legal claims before distinguished expert panels. The panel comprises judges from international courts and tribunals, professors of international (criminal) law and other legal professionals. This network makes the ICC Moot Court Competition a realistic simulation of ICC proceedings. The competition’s case addresses fundamental issues of substantive and procedural international criminal law.

The competition consists of an extensive six-day educational and social programme, bringing together students of diverse backgrounds and cultures to The Hague to challenge their skills as future international lawyers. Each team takes on three roles in a hypothetical case: prosecutor, legal representative of victims, and defence counsel. Each role writes a memorial which is reviewed and judged by a legal expert, which helps determine who goes through to the next round. The final round of the competition takes place at the premises of the ICC, judged by a bench consisting of ICC judges.

To find out more about the ICC Moot Court Competition, go to iccmoot.com


The IBA’s ICC Moot Court Manual

The IBA has developed a Moot Court Manual containing five exercises to introduce students to the work of the ICC.

In these exercises, students are given an ICC judgment involving events that occurred during a civil war in a fictional country. During the hypothetical conflict, a large number of war crimes were committed that were so serious that the ICC in The Hague wants to put people on trial for them. Student Members can gain access to these materials and guidance notes, allowing them to stage their own small-scale moot court exercise.

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