Already an IBA member? Sign in for a better website experience

Search programmes

No results were found for the entered search term
  • Committees
  • Type
  • Days

Monday 11 October (0900 - 1015)

Programme details

In the context of the EU’s digital strategy, the European Commission is conducting a significant review of the rules governing the online environment, which have been applied for the last two decades in this region. Since the adoption of the e-Commerce Directive (2000/31/EC), the emergence of new technologies and innovative digital services has led to substantial benefits to society, but also to challenges and risks which need to be addressed. For this purpose, in December 2020 the Commission published two proposals for a Regulation: the Digital Services Act (DSA) and the Digital Markets Act (DMA). This package introduces a new harmonised regulatory framework for digital services and online platforms. The DSA is focused on intermediary services - such as online marketplaces, social media, or app stores- and imposes asymmetric obligations on providers of digital services based on their size and market impact (with heavier regulation for systemic platforms). The DSA establishes, for instance, new notice-and-action mechanisms for illegal content, transparency obligations regarding online advertising or content-recommendation algorithms, rules on the traceability of business users and an enhanced oversight system of platforms operations. On the other hand, the DMA intends to avoid unfair business practices and abuses by core platform providers acting as gatekeepers between business users and end users. To this end, it imposes ex ante obligations for platforms qualifying as gatekeepers empowers the Commission to conduct market investigations and imposes very high fines (10% of the total worldwide annual turnover) and behavioural and structural remedies in the case of systematic non-compliance. During this session, we will analyse the changes brought by these legislative initiatives and its interplay with ex post remedies, focusing on the new set of rules and obligations for the providers of digital services and the impact on their day-to-day operations, the related rights for ends-users and business users, and the supervision and enforcement mechanisms to ensure compliance.

Read more

Session/Workshop Chair(s)

Monday 11 October (1015 - 1045)

Monday 11 October (1045 - 1200)

Art, Cultural Institutions and Heritage Law Committee (Lead)

Programme details

NFT’s have become the new trend in the art market and raise many legal questions for the parties involved. This workshop will be an open discussion about the legal issues at stake when selling or buying an NFT, from the artist’s rights to the collector’s estate. The discussion will include an analysis of recent NFT sales from the point of view of the artist and copyright holder, the auctioneer and gallery, and of the buyer.

Read more

Monday 11 October (1200 - 1315)

Intellectual Property and Entertainment Law Committee (Lead)
Technology Law Committee (Lead)

Programme details

Digital identity is more than just a buzzword. As platforms and online transactions are skyrocketing, establishing, deploying, and managing digital identity becomes essential. With villains lurking and trust being a fragile good, services providers and operators want to get it right. Authentication, attribution, and signature are just a few functionalities where digital identity plays a key role. Facial recognition, fingerprinting and other unique identifiers are often used. This session addresses how some of the major industries deal with challenges and how legal systems struggle to create legal certainty and facilitate cross border solutions.

Read more

Monday 11 October (1315 - 1415)

 

Monday 11 October (1415 - 1530)

Programme details

This session will discuss a variety of satellite business-related topics. These will include legal and regulatory issues regarding ‘Old Space’ applications - such as telecommunications and broadcasting satellites - and small satellite constellations, as they are being positioned in space by private companies, including Starlink and OneWeb. Further, this session will also discuss the regulatory framework for licensing and bringing satellites into use, and the legal and technical challenges of space debris removal, given that the number of objects in space already pose multiple risks.

Read more

Session/Workshop Chair(s)

Monday 11 October (1530 - 1600)

Monday 11 October (1600 - 1715)

Intellectual Property and Entertainment Law Committee (Lead)

Programme details

At the outset of the Covid-19 pandemic a remarkable mobilisation of resources occurred; governments removed anti-trust restrictions and provided capital, pharmaceutical companies large and small collaborated, and biotechnology companies and universities pooled knowledge. There were still regulatory roadblocks and problems of scale, but the significant scientific breakthroughs and miraculous innovations have helped combat the disease. This panel will discuss how (or if) the intellectual property laws of different countries helped the innovation of new diagnostics, treatments and vaccines related to Covid-19. The panel will also discuss whether the intellectual property laws helped, or hindered, the distribution of those same technologies.

Read more

Session/Workshop Chair(s)

Monday 11 October (1715 - 1815)

Tuesday 12 October (0900 - 1015)

Programme details

Covid-19 has accelerated the obliteration of traditional industry boundaries, with technology coming in the forefront of every industry, creating new and wonderful M&A opportunities. Technological advances are changing the way we live our lives and do business: industries such as HealthTech, FinTech, and CleanTech are now a part of our vocabulary.

2021 has seen optimism in global technology, media and telecommunications M&A activity with record capital supply and investments via Initial Public Offering (IPO), Special Purpose Acquisition Company (SPACs) and Venture Capital (VC) funding. The WarnerMedia and Discovery merger and Amazon’s acquisition of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) has increased competition while encouraging consolidation in the media streaming space.

Further, deep tech is fast competing with software as a service (SaaS), in terms of the focus of companies building capability and creating value. VC investment is also finding its way in technologies, such as through quantum computing, space exploration, and energy storage. At the same time, on the cross-border front there is a definite move from globalisation towards increased sovereignty and protectionism. Data, privacy, and cryptocurrency laws are under scrutiny across the world.

The panel will discuss trends such as these that define the global technology M&A landscape today, and while addressing the hindrances, will remain optimistic about the technology industry’s role in value-creating M&A for the rest of 2021. Covid-19 has allowed capital to be accumulated, and the same needs to be spent. Digitisation and disruptions offer opportunities for technology adoption.

Read more

Session/Workshop Chair(s)

Tuesday 12 October (1015 - 1045)

Tuesday 12 October (1045 - 1200)

Programme details

For the past year, the telecommunications field has had to drive through a challenging road to shape the main pillars and standards for 5G. Nowadays, in a time when most of the developed countries have already granted licenses for deploying and operating 5G networks within their territories, a series of legal, regulatory, competition and security concerns around 5G has the potential to make the path for achieving its full development not as smooth as it could be.

Notwithstanding states and supranational organisation have always treated telecommunications as a strategic matter, the arrival of 5G along with the commercial and technological race - mainly led by the USA and China - has compelled such entities to consider 5G networks as one of the most significant national and international economic and security issues of recent years. Thus, the telecommunications community is focusing on analysing how to deal with the expected 5G deployment pace and the swift emergence of innovative 5G applications within a robust legal and regulatory framework that could protect national interests, ensure free competition, and guarantee citizens/consumers digital rights.

This panel will address the legal and regulatory challenges for the deployment and operation of 5G networks, especially concerning infrastructure and equipment, cybersecurity, technology dependence, new applications, and the need of coordination between states and supranational organisations.

Read more

Session/Workshop Chair(s)

Tuesday 12 October (1200 - 1300)